The Internet – The state we’re in!

Click for visualisations

Akamai have just published their Fourth Quarter 2011 Report – The State of the Internet (available on registration).

They also have a couple of neat data visualisations with variable metrics by country (links from our header and first graphic).

Click for visualisations

The first by country has:

  • Average connection speed
  • Average peak connection speed
  • Unique IP addresses
  • High broadband adoption >5 Mbps
  • Broadband adoption >2 Mbps
  • Narrowband adoption < 256 kbps

The second allows you to get graphical representations for comparative broadband speeds for 100 countries and 51 US states over varying timeframes from Q3 2007 to Q4 2011.

On a global basis they calculate that average connection speeds have reduced by 14% in the quarter (from Q3 2011) and on a year-on-year basis the average is up by 19%.

In addition to Broadband speed and connectivity statistics the report monitors Attack traffic originating countries where we are pleased to report that the UK does not figure in the top 10. China is #1 with the US at #2

That’s really the last of the good news (apart from a lonely mention for the Isle of Man which we shall return to a little later on)!

The UK’s performance is shown as being:

Akamai – Quarter 4 2011
Connectivity speeds / adoption UK *Europe World     US
Average connection speed Mbps   4.9     5.4    2.3     5.8
Average peak connection speed Mbps 20.4   21.6  11.7   24.2
Broadband adoption > 2 Mbps 91%   86%  66%   80%
High broadband adoption > 5 Mbps 30%   33%  27%   44%
*I.co.uk average estimate

Our relative performance gives us the following rankings:

Akamai – Quarter 4 2011
UK Position in # Europe World
Average connection speed    16   25
Average peak connection speed    14   26
Broadband connectivity % > 2Mbps     7   12

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The Netherlands has the highest  performances in Europe in general with South Korea leading the world.

 

 

 

 

 

The Isle of Man heads the worldwide connectivity statistics at 97% for speeds of above 2 Mbps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quite a way to go if the Government is to achieve its broadband objective to “ ….  have the best superfast broadband network in Europe by 2015”.

Maybe we should look to roll out the B4RN  (Broadband for The Rural North) project nationally!

We shall see!

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